The long-awaited replacement for the Volvo XC60 SUV was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show, taking design inspiration from the larger XC90. Featuring a range of four-cylinder petrol and diesel engines, lashings of technology and advanced safety kit, it will cost from £37,205 when it arrives in dealerships this summer.

It’s a crucial model for Volvo, with the first-generation XC60 making up 30 per cent of the brand’s sales and finding almost a million homes, as it became the top-selling premium medium-sized SUV. The new model will face tougher competition than ever before in a burgeoning class, including the likes of the all-new Audi Q5, Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class, BMW X3, Jaguar F-Pace and upcoming Range Rover Velar.

With the boldest interpretation yet of Volvo’s new ‘Thor’s hammer’ daytime running light trademark, the XC60 is instantly recognisable as belonging to the Swedish marque. It’s also lower and sleeker than the XC90, with a tapered roofline and rising beltline for a sportier aesthetic. While it’s a clear evolution of the old model, look closely and there are lots of modern design features and sharp lines, while its LED tail-lights should make the XC60 look particularly distinctive at night.

The interior also owes a lot to the XC90, and that’s definitely no bad thing, as we’ve praised that car’s cabin design very highly. The portrait-orientated Sensus touchscreen infotainment system takes pride of place in the middle of the dashboard, while the analogue gauges of the outgoing XC60 are replaced with a customisable digital panel. Music lovers will also be pleased to note there’s a Bowers & Wilkins audio system on the options list, although it will set you back £2,500. Dashboard materials and upholstery look to be just as impressive as the XC90, and a raft of driving aids should also relieve stress. Pilot Assist will allow semi-autonomous driving, taking control of the car in traffic and driving in a chosen lane on the motorway at speeds of up to 80mph. Boot space measures 505 litres with the rear seats in place – up 10 litres compared to its predecessor – expanding to 1,432 litres with the chairs folded down. Being a Volvo, safety is clearly at the forefront, and the XC60 has a new system which takes autonomous emergency braking one step further, by also adding Steer Assist. This can help mitigate headon collisions with steering input as well as braking, and also works in conjunction with blind-spot sensors to help avoid lanechanging accidents.

At the car’s launch this summer, engines will include a 2.0-litre D4 diesel engine with 188bhp and a D5 PowerPulse unit providing 232bhp, with acceleration from 0-62mph in 8.4 and 7.2 seconds respectively. Fourwheel- drive and an automatic eight-speed gearbox are standard across the range, with economy of 54.3mpg in the D4 and 51.4mpg with the D5. Hovering around the new £40,000 tax barrier, any XC60 costing under this figure will be £140 to tax per instantly recognisable as belonging to the Swedish marque. It’s also lower and sleeker than the XC90, with a tapered roofline and rising beltline for a sportier aesthetic. While it’s a clear evolution of the old model, look closely and there are lots of modern design features and sharp lines, while its LED tail-lights should make the XC60 look particularly distinctive at night.

The interior also owes a lot to the XC90, and that’s definitely no bad thing, as we’ve praised that car’s cabin design very highly. The portrait-orientated Sensus touchscreen infotainment system takes pride of place in the middle of the dashboard, while the analogue gauges of the outgoing XC60 are replaced with a customisable digital panel. Music lovers will also be pleased to note there’s a Bowers & Wilkins audio system on the options list, although it will set you back £2,500. Dashboard materials and upholstery look to be just as impressive as the XC90, and a raft of driving aids should year or £450 annually if the list price, including optional extras, take the cost over the threshold.

Trim levels are called Momentum, R-Design and Inscription, but each is also available in Pro specification, making a total of six. Even the standard car has keyless entry, LED headlights, 19-inch wheels, a powered-tailgate, climate control, Sensus infotainment system and leather upholstery. R-Design trim gives a sportier look inside and out, along with sharper suspension and larger wheels, as well as a fully digital instrument display. Inscription trims boost the luxury feel, adding Nappa leather and features like electric seats, mood lighting and extra chrome trim for the exterior.

Initially just petrol and diesel engines will be offered, but later a T8-engined plug-in hybrid model will join the lineup. A 315bhp 2.0-litre turbochared petrol engine is mated with an 87bhp electric motor to produce a combined power output of 402bhp. Acceleration to 62mph is completed in just 5.3 seconds with CO2 emissions of just 49g/km, according to official figures.